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Digital Badge Courses

The free asynchronous courses on this page are intended as an introduction to the content described in the course summary. While each course is slightly different, you can expect to watch recorded lectures, perhaps do some reading, and then take a quiz on the material. To advance through the course you must get at least 80% of the questions in a quiz correct. However, if you don’t score that high, you are permitted to review the material and retake the quiz. At the end of the course, you will take a final exam which you must also pass with an 80% or higher. However, you are also permitted to go back and review the materials and retake the test if you score below 80%.

 

Please read through the prerequisites, the learning objectives, and the course summaries then if you would like to take one of the courses fill out the form at the bottom of this page.  Please note that while you are welcome to take all of the courses they must be completed one at a time.  Once you have completed a course you will receive a digital badge that can be displayed on LinkedIn or any other social media outlet. 

 

 

Courses

Science Fundamentals
steve

Dr. Steven Ellingson creator of the module.

Prerequisites: Two college-level physics or engineering courses.

 

Learning Objectives: 1)Describe the wavebands comprising the electromagnetic spectrum in terms of frequency, wavelength, and uses, 2) Describe the characteristics of waves in free space, including the distinction between spherical and plane waves, spatial power density, and polarization, 3) Analyze the propagation of radio waves, including spreading loss and reflection, 4) Describe radio signals in terms of modulation, bandwidth, and spectrum, and 5) Describe the radio frequency spectrum including anthropogenic signals and external noise.

Summary: This course will introduce students to the physical principles and concepts that those involved in the analysis, design, or management of the electromagnetic spectrum might need to know, including waves, propagation of waves, properties of signals in the time and frequency domain, and noise.

 

Estimated Time to Complete: 10 hours (4.5 hours lecture, 4 hours reading, 1.5 hours quizzes)

Availability: Currently Available

Engineering Fundamentals
steve

Dr. Steven Ellingson creator of the module.

Prerequisites: Two college-level physics or engineering courses

Learning Objectives: 1)Describe the elements of a radio link, including the architectures of transmitters and receivers, 2) Describe the relevant characteristics of antennas when transmitting and receiving, 3) Describe types of antennas, including which antennas are used in various applications and why, 4) Assess the sensitivity of a receiver, accounting for internal and external noise and, 5) Analyze radio links using the Friis transmission equation and link budget.

 

Summary: This course will introduce students to the engineering principles and concepts that those involved in the analysis, design, or management of the radio frequency spectrum may need to know, including transmitters, receivers, antennas, and radio link analysis.

 

Estimated Time to Complete: 13 hours (4.5 hours lecture, 7 hours reading, 1.5 hours quizzes)

Availability: Currently Available

Spectrum Management Methods
roger

Dr. Roger Peterson co-creator of the module.

Dennis

Dennis Roberson co-creator of the module.

Prerequisites: Two college-level physics or engineering courses.

Learning Objectives: 1)Students will be able to describe the milestones in cellular communication development, 2)Students will be able to identify the function of each agency that governs the use of spectrum and, 3) Students will use spectrum management methods to reduce the interference between users.

Summary: During this course, students will be introduced to the methods used to manage the radio frequency portions of the spectrum. The course begins with a general description of the electromagnetic spectrum and the national and international agencies responsible for regulating the use of the spectrum. Next, students will learn about standard spectrum management methods, including geographic, frequency, time, and code isolation. During the last portion of the course, the focus shifted to cellular radio communications. Students will learn about the progression of technologies from the AMPS system to LTE and 4G ending with a brief explanation of 5G.

 

Estimated Time to Complete: TBD

Availability: Under Development

Spectrum Economics and Market Tools
Sarah

Dr. Sarah Oh Lam creator of the module.

Prerequisites: One year of post-secondary education

 

Learning Objectives: 1) Students will be able to describe the economic benefit of spectrum licenses, 2) Students will be able to identify the importance of spectrum auctions, and 3) Students will be able to discuss the current events involving the spectrum and the impact on Spectrum Economics.

 

Summary: This course examines spectrum economics and market tools such as auctions, secondary markets, unlicensed bands, and experimental licenses. Course material will cover the foundations of spectrum valuation, allocation methods, and economic concepts. This undergraduate course should assist in improving student analytical skills, particularly regarding current advances in wireless technology.

 

Estimated Time to Complete: TBD

Availability: Under Development

Legal and Regulatory Foundations of Spectrum Management
Lisa Photo Headshot

Lisa Sockett creator of the module.

Prerequisites: One year of post-secondary education

 

Learning Objectives: 1)Students will be able to identify the International and national agencies in charge of spectrum allocation,  2) Students will be able to identify the accomplishments of early spectrum-related legislation, 3) Students will be able to articulate the difference between licensed and unlicensed spectrum, 4) Students will understand the process of reallocating spectrum from one use to another, 5) Students will be able to describe some current spectrum-sharing initiatives, 6) Students will be able to describe the FCC rule-making process, and 7) Students will be able to analyze federal agencies' progress in meeting spectrum-centric goals set by Congress.

 

Summary: This course will introduce you to the legal and regulatory aspects of spectrum management. The course begins with a simple explanation of the electromagnetic spectrum and the terminology associated with spectrum regulation. Then the earliest spectrum-related policies are examined both for their significance at the time they were issued and for how they shaped current policies. The course then examines some new ideas that led to new policies. After reviewing some of these policies, the course will take an in-depth look at the FCC rule-making process. Finally, the course ends by looking at the future of spectrum management.

 

Estimated Time to Complete: 20 hours (3.25 hours lecture, 15 hours reading, 1.75 hours quizzes)

Availability: Currently available

Radio Astronomy and the Spectrum
ed

Dr. Edward Murphy creator of the module.

Prerequisites: Two college-level physics courses

Learning Objectives: 1) Students will be able to articulate why using radio waves to study celestial bodies is an important part of astronomy, 2) Students will be able to describe how radio telescopes collect data, 3) Students will be able to identify and describe various types of emissions that are important for radio astronomy.

 

Summary: During this course, students will learn about how Radio Astronomy uses the electromagnetic spectrum. The course begins with an overview of types of astronomy. Then, students will learn about the importance of radio astronomy during a lecture that focuses on the data which can only be gathered with a radio telescope. Afterward, students will take an in-depth look at radio telescopes. During the three lectures on this topic, students will learn about the components, how to determine the amount of power the telescope is receiving from a celestial body and evaluate the effectiveness of radio telescopes at collecting radio waves. Next, students will learn how radio astronomers use aperture synthesis techniques to build larger telescopes using several telescopes arranged in a pattern. Finally, students will learn about thermal blackbody emission, synchrotron emission, and spectral lines.

 

Estimated Time to Complete: 18.5 hours (7.25 hours lecture, 9.25 hours reading, 2 hours quizzes)

Availability: Currently available

Using the Course

If you would like to take one of these courses please fill out this form. Remember, you are welcome to take all of the courses but you must take one at a time.